Mary Kenney

William Henry Hogan (1892-1918)
Margaret Mary Kenney (1890-1944
)

Margaret Mary Kenney was born in Dungog in 1890 (NSW birth record 12377/1890, however she was registered as Mary M), the ninth of eleven children of James Kenney & Mary Scholastica Thecla Walker.

William Henry Hogan, known as Bill, was born in 1882 to James Patrick (or Francis) Hogan & Johanna Finnin in Devenish, Victoria, which is about 50 km east of Shepparton and just under 30 km north of Benalla.

It is possible that Bill had been prospecting at Norseman, 180 km south of Kalgoorlie as he is mentioned as a rent defaulter in the Norseman Times, Mon 24 May 1909:

The following is culled from the “Government Gazette ” of May 14:—

In accordance with section 96 of “The Mining Act, 1904,” notice is hereby given that unless rents and fines due for the current year be paid on the undermentioned leases on or before the 30th day of June, 1909, it is the intention of the Governor, under the provisions of section 97 of the ‘Mining Act to forfeit such leases for breach of covenant, viz., nonpayment of rent.—Henry Gregory, Minister for Mines.

1066 …
William Henry Hogan, E…

However he became a wharf labourer and worked at Freemantle. Bill and Margaret married in Fremantle, Western Australia, in 1912.

Bill was an unwell man, a fact mentioned in his mother-in-law’s letter she wrote to the army in 1917 requesting that her son Alexander Bruce Kenney be sent home from the Front on compassionate grounds (see also Alexander Bruce‘s webpage), saying:

… The daughter who looks after me has been very ill, and unable to keep on doing the work for me, and her own family; her husband is also a very delicate man, so he is unable to help me. …

Bill passed away on New Year’s Day the following year. From The West Australian, Wed 02 Jan 1918:

THE FREMANTLE LUMPERS’ UNION.

HOGAN.—The Members of the above Union are respectfully invited to follow the remains of their late comrade, Mr. William Henry Hogan to the place of interment, the Roman Catholic portion of the Fremantle Cemetery. The Funeral is appointed to leave the residence of his father-in-law, Mr. James Kenney No. 7 Manning-street, South Fremantle, THIS (Wednesday) AFTERNOON. the 2nd inst., at 1 o’clock.

[Note. The Fremantle Lumpers’ Union, formed to represent for wharf labourers, was the first known union of unskilled labour in Western Australia. It was formed after a recruiting mission to the west by the Adelaide Lumpers’ Union in 1889 and was inspired, perhaps, by the solidarity shown in the Great Dock Strike workers in Britain of that year. It joined the Waterside Workers’ Federation in 1910 but broke away in 1933 after a dispute with the Federal Executive of the Waterside Workers’ Federation over the method of collection of union dues. It reaffiliated in 1946 with the Waterside Workers’ Federation, Fremantle Branch. Source: ANU Archives.]

From the family tributes we learn that there were three children. The list order is on the whole Dolly, Billie and Eric, so most probably birth order oldest first. We are fairly certain that Dolly was born in 1912 and is short for Doreen. There was a Dor[r]een M Hogan born in Fremantle in 1912. We knew of William’s birth details, and from a later death notice we know that there was another son, Eric H Hogan; there is a birth record of an Eric H Hogan in Fremantle in 1916. So the three children’s details are as follows:

01. Dorothy May (b. 1912, died in Otawa, Canada), known as Dolly

02. William James (b. 1913, d. 29 Jan 1928) known as Billy

03. Eric Henry (b. 1916, d. 1947 in Perth)

Family tributes:

From The West Australian, Sat 12 Jan 1918 and the Western Mail, on Fri 18 Jan 1918:

HOGAN.—On New Year’s Day, 1918, at South Fremantle, William Henry Hogan, second beloved son of Mrs. C. Wilson and stepson of C. E. Wilson, brother of Jack, Jim, Matthew, Patrick, and Mrs. Jock Carter, New South Wales, and Lillie Hogan, North Fremantle. A patient sufferer at rest.

HOGAN.—I loving memory of our dear daddy, William Henry Hogan, died January 1, 1918.
God has daddy safe in His keeping,

Just on the other side.

He waits for us then vain is weeping,

In peace he now abides.

Inserted by his loving children, Dolly, Billy,
Eric Hogan, L. J. Kenny.

HOGAN.—In sad but loving memory of our dear son, William Henry, who died at South Fremantle on New Year’s Day, 1918.
How hard it was to part with him we held
on earth
So dear, the heart no greater trial knows, no
sorrow more severe.
Inserted by his loving mother and step-father,
C. E. Wilson, and brother Patrick Hogan.

HOGAN.—In sad but loving memory of our dear brother, William, who departed this life on January 1 (New Year’s Day), 1918, at South Fremantle. Ever remembered.
Inserted by his loving sister and brother-in-
law, Lily and Alf. Williams, and little Thelma.

From The West Australian, Thu 01 Jan 1920:

HOGAN.—In loving memory of our dear daddy, William Henry Hogan, died January 1,
In our home you are fondly remembered, dear
daddy,
Sweet memories linger around your name.

True hearts that always loved you

Will always do the same.

Inserted by his three dear little children,
Billie, Eric, Dolly.

HOGAN.—In sad but loving memory of my dear son, William Henry, who died at South Fremantle on New Year’s Day, 1918, aged 32 ears.
This day brings back our memory fresh
Of one who’s called to rest;
And those who think of him to-night
Are those who loved him best.
Just when his life was brightest,
Just when his hopes were best,

He was called from this world of sorrow

To a home of eternal rest.
Inserted by his loving mother and stepfather, C. E. Wilson; brother, Patrick Hogan, and sister Lily Williams.

HOGAN.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Bill, who passed away at Fremantle on January 1, 1918. To memory ever dear. Inserted by his brother and sister-in-law Jack and Mat.

HOGAN.—In loving memory of our dear brother and brother-in-law, William Henry Hogan, died January 1, 1918.
True hearts that loved in fondest affection

Always shall love you in death just the same.

Inserted by his brother Matt., and sister-
in-law Monica Hogan and mother-in-law and father-in-law.

HOGAN.—In loving memory of William Henry Hogan, died January 1, 1918. Ever remembered. Inserted by his loving sister-in-law and brother, Eva and James Hogan.

Margaret and her parents must have organised some sort of concert, as reported in The West Australian, Wed 6 Mar 1918; the Anderson Entertainers were a well-known Freemantle group of musicians:

MR. and Mrs. JAMES KENNEY and Mrs. WILIAM HOGAN desire to sincerely THANK the Anderson Entertainers, including the organisers (Mr. E. B. Hogan and the hon. secretary, Roy H. Dunn) for their recent effort on their behalf; also all those who assisted in any way to make the entertainment such a success.

01. Dolly Hogan married Raymond G B Gould  born in Claremont in 1913) in Perth in 1933 and they had one child, Lorraine (information from a newspaper notice, see below). The family believe Dolly died in Ottawa, Canada, but are not sure when.

02. Billy Hogan sadly died after a long illness in 1921. From The West Australian, Sat 04 Feb 1928 and the Western Mail, Thu 9 Feb 1928:

HOGAN.-On January 29, at Fremantle Hospital. William James, eldest son of the late William Henry Hogan, and loving grandson of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Wilson, North Fremantle, and loving nephew of John, James, Matthew and Patrick Hogan, North Fremantle, Mrs. Jock Carter, Sydney, Mrs. Alf. Williams, Melbourne; aged 14 years and 5 months. A little sufferer at rest.

From The West Australian, Tue 29 Jan 1929:

HOGAN.—In loving memory of our dear son and grandson, William James Hogan, who died on January 29, 1928.

With tears we saw him sinking;
We watched him fade away;
We tendered him with fondest love,
But could not make him stay — our Billy.
Inserted by his loving mother and stepfather, Mary and George Lawson, also grandma, grandfather, Mary and James Kenney.

HOGAN. — In loving memory of our dear brother, Bill, also our dear father, who passed away on January 1, 1918.

Day by day our thoughts do wander,              
To a grave not far away;            

Where they laid our darling brother,      

Just one year ago to-day.    

Dearly loved — sadly missed.

Inserted by his loving sister and brother, Dolly and Eric Hogan, and cousins Vera and Frank McDonnell.

03.  Eric Hogan enlisted during WWII (Service Number – WX37505), however his record is not yet available on line. In the 1954 electoral rolls he was a railway employee residing at 16 Belfour St, Kalgoorlie; at the same address was a Violet Hogan. In 1958 he is listed as a miner at 45 Vine St, Kalgoorlie, and Violet is listed there as well. Eric passed away on 16 Jun 1995, Mitcham South Australia.

Margaret Mary then married George Lawson in Freemantle in 1919 and six more children were born.

04. Bruce James (b. 31 Aug 1920 in Freemantle, d. 1988)

05. Phyllis Thecla (b. 11 Aug 1923 in Freemantle, d. 25 Jul 2010 in Perth)

06. Mary Irene (b. 1924, d. )

07. Glen Clarence (b. 1926 in Northam, d. 10 Mar 1988 in Perth)

08. James F (b. 1927 in Northam, d. )

09. George Lindsay (b. 1931 in Freemantle, d. 1958 in Boulder)

The family believe George was known as Glen; if we are correct, there are two clippings that involve him. From the West Australian, Mon 30 Aug 1926:

IN THE LOCAL COURT OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA.
Held at MERREDIN
Execution 243/X26. 301/26
Between A. R. MORRISON (Plaintiff) and GLEN LAWSON (Defendant)

THE BAILIFF will SELL by PUBLIC AUCTION, at the Town Hall, Fremantle on TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 14 (unless the warrants herein be previously satisfied) all the Defendant’s right, title and interest in the following lands:—

(1) All that piece of land being Avon Lo
cation 20787 and being the whole of the land comprised in Crown Lease 501/1922, Conditional Purchase Lease 38780/53.

(2) All that piece of land being Avon location 20775 being the whole of the land comprised in Crown Lease 1905/1925, Condrtional Purchase Lease 18114/68.

For further particulars apply to W. E. Courthope Solicitor, Merredin, or J. W. Cruthers, Local Court Bailiff, Fremantle. Sale at 3.30 p.m. Terms cash.

The Albany Advertiser, Thuy 27 Sep 1928 and reported in the Sunday Times on Sun 30 Sept 1928:

Crashed into Train
Moto Truck Occupants Have Narrow Escape.
PETROL IGNITES.

PERTH, Sept. 27.—A remarkable escape from injury was made by the occupants of a motor truck which crashed into a railway train at Rivervale level crossing at 8.5 p.m. yesterday.

The truck was smashed severely, and, swerving, it ran into a cattle pit at the side of the crossing. The truck was driven by Glen Lawson, of North Fremantle, with Frank McDonnell, of Fremantle, as a passenger.

A cargo of petrol cases was being carried on the vehicle, and after the collision several cases hemmed in Lawson so that he could not jump out. He had the presence of mind to swerve sharply, and the truck crashed into a neighboring cattle pit. McDonnell then jumped clear. Some petrol fell into the pit, and from an unknown cause it ignited. The flames spread to the pit’s woodwork.

[Francis McDonnell was married to Minnie Agnes Kenney, Margaret’s sister, so is Glen’s brother-in-law. Ed]

Margaret passed away on 15 Mar 1944 in Kalgoorlie. We could find only two notices of her death, and interestingly these were not from her immediate family; they also allude to some long-term illness. From the Kalgoorlie Miner, Thu 16 Mar 1944:

LAWSON.—In sad and loving memory of a dear friend, Mrs. M. Lawson, who passed away March 15, 1944.
A patient sufferer at rest
—Inserted by Nell Arthur.

LAWSON.—On March 15, at Kalgoorlie District Hospital, Mary Margaret, loving aunt of Mavis and Jim and Jessie Hollis.
A patient sufferer at rest.

and on Fri 17 Mar 1944:

LAWSON.—In loving memory of Mary Margaret Lawson, who passed away at the Kalgoorlie District Hospital on March 15, 1944, fond friend of Mr. and Mrs. Sarich and family.
Loved by all.

LAWSON.—In sad and loving memory of dear aunty Mary, who passed away on March 15, 1944.
One of the very best.
— Inserted by Vera and Frank Agar
and family.

LAWSON.—In memory of my dear friend, Mrs. M. Lawson, who passed away on March 15, 1944.
Always remembered.  

An in memoriam did appear the following years from her immediate family.

Firstly, on Fri 15 Mar 1946:

LAWSON.—In loving memory of our dear mother, who fell asleep on March 15, 1944.
She had a smile for everyone,
Her heart was true and tender,

She did her best for those she
loved,
Then left us to remember.

—Inserted by her loving family
and daughter-in-law.

LAWSON.—In treasured memories of our darling mother, Mary Margaret, who passed away March 15, 1944.
—Inserted by her loving daughter and son-in-law, grandchild, Dolly, Ray, and Lorraine Gould.

LAWSON.—In loving memory of my dear mother, who passed away March 15, 1944.
Till morning breaks, and shadows flee away.
—Inserted by her loving son,
George.

The following day:

LAWSON. — In loving memory of a dear pal, Mary, who passed away on March 16, 1944. Ever remembered.
—Inserted by Mrs. McKenzie, 60
Dugan street, Kalgoorlie.

Sat 15 Mar 1947:

LAWSON.— In memory of our darling mother, Mary Margaret, who passed away March 15, 1944.
Happy and smiling, always content
Loved and respected wherever she
went,
Always cheerful, loving and kind,
What a beautiful memory she left
behind.
—Inserted by her loving daughters
Dolly, Phyllis, Mary, son-in-law Ray, grandchild Lorraine.

Mon 15 Mar 1948:

LAWSON.— In loving memory of our dear mother, Mary Margaret, who passed away on March 15, 1944.
Always in our thoughts, mother dear.
—Inserted by her loving daughters, Dolly. Phyllis and Mary, and grandchild, Lorraine.

Her son-in-law Ray Gould was not mentioned in the last two tributes. In addition, none of them involved her husband George, who passed away on 14 Oct 1950 in the Hollywood Hospital, Kalgoorlie. George must have married again because at the time of his death his wife was named as Mabel. From the Kalgoorlie Miner, Tue 17 Oct 1950:

LAWSON.—On October 14, at Hollywood Hospital, George, loved husband of Mabel, fond father of Bruce, Phyllis, Mary (Mrs. Towl), Glen, James and George; stepfather of Dolly (Mrs Gould), Eric and William (deceased); son-in-law of Mrs. F. James, of Esperance.
At the end of suffering, dear one,
Dawns the grand new day;
Carry on, brave soul, carry on.

LAWSON.—On October 14, 1950, at Hollywood Hospital, George, loving father and father-in-law, of Bruce and Mary, and grandfather of Kaye and Kevin. Sadly missed.

We can find few records for this family, so once again we hope someone out there can assist us (email donnamatty@hotmail.com and copy to mick@oneillfamily.id.au).

04. Bruce James Lawson enlisted at Rottnest on 30 Dec 1942, service number WX36185, naming his half-sister Dolly his next-of-kin. He served for the remainder of the war and was discharged as a corporal from the 12 Corps of Signals on 06 Dec 1945. From his father’s death notice it appears he had married (his wife’s name was Mary) and they had two children, Kaye and Kevin.

05. Phyllis Thecla Lawson married Sydney James Shade and they had three daughters. Sydney was born on 21 Feb 1919 at Mansfield in Victoria and died on 09 Nov 2005 in Perth. Phyllis died in Perth on 25 Jul 2010.

06. Mary Irene Lawson we know nothing about except that, from her father’s death notice, it seems she had married a man by the name of Towl.

07. James F Lawson we also know nothing about.

08. Glen Clarence Lawson became an apprentice turner at a factory in Kalgoorlie. He was in and out of trouble in these early years, and in one case the magistrate referred to him having had a battle in life.

Firstly, from the Kalgoorlie Miner, Sat 15 Dec 1945:

COMMITTED A NUISANCE

In the Kalgoorlie Police Court yesterday, before Messrs. L. W. Stotter, R.M. and R. G. Moore, J.P., Glen Clarence Lawson (19), turner, pleaded guilty to a charge of having been disorderly by committing a nuisance in Cassidy street the previous evening. He was fined £5, with 1/6 costs.

The Kalgoorlie Miner, Thu 11 Apr 1946:

Stealing Alleged
THREE YOUNG MEN CHARGED

Three young men, Raymond Thomas Mayger (18), single, labourer, of Macdonald street; Glen J Clarence Lawson (19), single, apprentice, of Brookman street, and Alfred George Flynn (19), single, labourer, of Carrington street, Kalgoorlie, were arrested yesterday by Detective-Sergeant Johnston and Detective Woodcock. They will appear in the Kalgoorlie Police Court this morning on charges of stealing.

and reported in more detail the following day:

ROBBERY CHARGES
Three Youths Admit Series of Burglaries
REMANDED FOR SENTENCE

There was a sequel to a series of recent Kalgoorlie robberies in the Kalgoorlie Police Court yesterday when three young men appeared on a number of charges of stealing and being unlawfully on premises for the purpose of stealing.

Raymond Thomas Mayger (18), single, labourer, of Macdonald street, Kalgoorlie, who was represented by Mr. H. D. S. Macoboy, pleaded guilty to five charges of having, on February 10, stolen about £8, the property of Ella May Caporn; on February 15, stolen £9 and a quantity of cigarettes of a total value of £14 12/, the property of Mick Vuletich; on March 12, been on the premises of Ella May Caporn, of 119 Hannan street, for the unlawful purpose of stealing; on March 31, stolen about £10, the property of Ella May Caporn, and on March 16, been on the premises of Jack Power Hehir, 175 Egan street, for the unlawful purpose of stealing.

Glen Clarence Lawson (19), single, apprentice, of Brookman street, pleaded guilty to two charges of having, on February 10, stolen about £8, the property of Ella May Caporn, and on February 15, stolen £9 and a quantity of cigarettes of a total value of £14 12/, the property, of Mick Vuletich.

Alfred George Flynn (19), single, labourer, of Carrington street, pleaded guilty to three charges of having, on March 12, been on the premises of Ella May Caporn, of 119 Hannan street, for the unlawful purpose of stealing, of having on March 16, been on the premises of Jack Power Hehir, of 175 Egan street, for the unlawful purpose of stealing, and, on March 31, of having stolen about £10, the property of Ella May Caporn.

Detective Woodcock told the court that Mayger and Lawson went to the back of the Australia Cafe after closing time on Feb ruary 10. Mayger broke the padlock on the back, door, entered the premises and stole £8 from the till. He gave £2 5/ to Lawson who had kept watch. On February 15 they went to the shop of Mick Vuletich in Hannan street where Mayger threw a brick through the front glass door, stole £9 which he shared with Lawson. Cigarettes to the value of £5 12/ were also stolen and hidden under the rail way bridge, but were gone when they went back three days later.

On March 12, Mayger and Flynn went to the back of the Australia Cafe after closing time, Mayger broke the padlock on the back door and went in while Flynn kept watch, but did not find any money. They pushed open the door of Jack Hehir’s shop at 175 Egan street, about midnight on March 16, and Mayger forced the register, but found no money. On March 31, Mayger and Flynn again went to the back of the Australia Cafe, Mayger forcing an entrance by breaking the padlock. He stole the sum of £10, some of which he offered Flynn who had kept watch, but Flynn would not take any.

Detective Woodcock added that Mayger, who had admitted the offences, had done no work for some months. Lawson was an apprentice turner at the foundry. Flynn had no mother, his father was unemployed and he himself was drawing unemployed relief.

Appealing for leniency, Mr. Macoboy said that Mayger was a victim of circumstances. He was one of a large family of eight children, his mother was in bad health and his father, who was employed on the trans-Australian railway line was away a lot of the time which meant that the defendant had little parental control. An unskilled labourer, Mayger had conducted a carrying business with a horse and trolley, but with the influx of returned servicemen he had been unable to get work. His father had agreed to make restitution and in the event of clemency being extended by the bench the defendant would be given a job woodcutting where he could cause no further trouble.

Mr. Stotter remarked that he could see no grounds for clemency and the defendants would be very lucky if they got away without gaol. They were remanded in custody for sentence this morning.

The Daily News, Sat 13 Apr 1946:

“Sponger” who heads for life in goal

KALGOORLIE, Sat — “I do not like sending young men to gaol. But in your case I have no compunction.” So said Magistrate Stotter to 18-year-old Raymond Thomas Mayger in Kalgoorlie Police Court today.

“You do no work; you sponge on your aged mother, and spend your time around billiard saloons, two-up schools, racecourses and similar places,” he went on.

“If you don’t wake up, you will spend most of your life in gaol.”

Mayger was charged, with 19-year old Glen Clarence Lawson and 19 year-old Alfred George Flynn, with theft and with having been unlaw fully on premises.

Mayger pleaded guilty to five charges, was sent to gaol for one month on four of them – one term to be served concurrently. On the fifth he was ordered to enter a bond of £50 to come up for sentence when called on.

He was also ordered to make restitution of £11/6/.

“LAST CHANCE”

“When considering these sentences I decided to give you one more last chance,” said Mr Stotter.

You will serve three months in gaol, possibly in Kalgoorlie, and therefore will not come under the influence of hardened criminals as you would do if sent elsewhere.

Addressing Lawson, who was Mayger’s accomplice on two occasions, the magistrate said that if it were not for the fact that he had only two months to go to finish an apprenticeship, the sentence would be more severe.

“You have been left very much to battle for yourself, but I warn you that if you come here again you will be severely dealt with,” he went on.

Lawson was released on bonds of £30 on each charge to come up for sentence when called on, and was ordered to make restitution of £11/6/.

To Flynn, who pleaded guilty to three charges, the magistrate said: ‘Your home life has not been as good as it might have been, owing to your family’s straightened circumstances.

“You have been weak and foolish enough to be led by Mayger, but it is to your credit that you refused to take any of the proceeds of the thefts.

“You will be fined £2 on each of the first two charges and will enter a bond of £30 to be of good behaviour for 12 months.”

There was a little more detail in the Kalgoorlie Miner on the same day, Saturday 13 April 1946:

BURGLARY CHARGES
One Youth Gaoled
LECTURES AND LENIENCY FOR TWO MORE

Three youths, brought up for sentence before Mr. L. W. Stotter, R.M., in the Kalgoorlie Police Court yesterday, on charges of stealing and being unlawfully on premises for the purpose of stealing, were given a severe talking to by the magistrate.

Raymond Thomas Mayger (18), single, labourer, of Macdonald street, Kalgoorlie. had pleaded guilty to five charges of having, on February 10, stolen about £8, the property of Ella May Caporn; on February 15, stolen £9 and a quantity of cigarettes, of a total value of £14 12/, the property of Mick Vuletich; on March 13, been on the premises of Ella May Caporn, of 119 Hannan street, for the unlawful purpose of stealing; on March 31, stolen about £10, the property of Ella May Caporn, and on March 16, been on the premises of Jack Power Hehir, 175 Egan street, for the unlawful purpose of stealing.

Glen Clarence Lawson (19), single, apprentice, of Brookman street, had pleaded guilty to two charges of having, on February 10, stolen about £8, the property of Ella May Caporn, and on February 15, stolen £9 and a quantity of cigarettes, of a total value of £14 12/, the property of Mick Vuletich.

Alfred George Flynn (19), single, labourer, of Carrington street, had pleaded guilty to three charges of having, on March 12, been on the premises of Ella May Caporn, of 119 Hannan street, for the unlawful purpose of stealing; of having, on March 16, been on the premises of Jack Power Hehir, of 175 Egan street, for the unlawful purpose of stealing, and, on March 31, of having stolen about £10, the property of Ella May Caporn.

Dealing first with Mayger, Mr. Stotter said he had had reports on the three youths. Mayger’s, he said, was far from satisfactory. “It is impossible for you to say you have not been, warned,” he said. “You have been in trouble before, but you have not had enough sense to take those warnings seriously. I do not like to send a young man to gaol, but in your case I have no compunction. You do no work. You hang around two-up schools, races and billiard saloons and you sponge on your aged mother. It is time you woke up to yourself.”

On the first charge Mayger was sentenced to one month’s imprisonment with hard labour, ordered to make restitution of £4 and to pay 2/6 costs. On the second charge he was sentenced to another month, ordered to make restitution of £7 6/ and to pay 2/6 costs. On the third charge he received another month, cumulative, making three months in all he has to serve. On the fourth charge he was sentenced to one month concurrent and on the fifth he was released on bond of £50 to come up for sentence when required to do so and to make restitution of £10.

Addressing Lawson, the magistrate said he had had a rather hard battle in life. On each charge he bound him over in a bond of £30 and ordered him to make restitution.

“You have been stupid enough to go along with Mayger,” said Mr. Stotter, addressing Flynn. On the first two charges he fined him £2 and released him on the third on a bond of £30.

The South Western Advertiser, Thursday 11 August 1949:

Returning to Kalgoorlie after a brief sojourn in Yarloop are Messrs. Glen Lawson and M. McLeod.

We don’t know much more of Glen’s life apart from his dying of lung cancer in Perth on 10 Mar 1988.

09. George Lindsay Lawson lived in Perth and was described as a presser; he died in Boulder on 07 Nov 1958, aged just 27, and is burried in the Anglican section of Kalgoorlie Cemetery.